The Great Swindle Santiago Montoya The Great Swindle Santiago Montoya
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Drawing upon political history, Montoya uses such materials as bank-notes and food coupons to create works that question our collective ideals and aspirations, reflecting upon past dreams of nations and the seeming disconnect of the realities that follow.
Embarking upon The Great Swindle series before the financial crisis really took hold of the world, Montoya saw bank-notes as...

Embarking upon The Great Swindle series before the financial crisis really took hold of the world, Montoya saw bank-notes as ready-made painted surfaces, as snapshots of time, theatres in which political propaganda and historic events play out. Yet these paintings come with their own pre-assigned commercial value which forms the basis of all international trade, relations and infrastructure, resulting in artwork saturated with layers of meaning.

The inescapable connotation of money is evident in the piece Money Talks. Here, looking at the tensions within international trade, Montoya brings together the currencies of eastern and western superpowers with bank-notes from China and the United States of America.

'While China seeks security in the US dollar, the US dollar is ever more dependent on China's economic growth. Mao looks west; Washington looks east.'
Santiago Montoya
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